Thursday, November 21, 2013

Introducing @OdaAddic New To @TeamMSLB @mslbmgmt




O DA ADDIC‘s got some mileage on him. A product of Atlantic City, New Jersey, DA ADDIC had a fractured, traumatic childhood – a single mother who struggled to make ends meet, a biological father who didn’t bother, assorted aunts, uncles and other relatives up and down the East coast who pitched in to help raise him. When DA ADDIC was 13 he left his mother in Olney, Maryland (a lily-white neighborhood near D.C. that didn’t do much for a budding hip-hop artist) and moved in with an aunt in Virginia where he got hip, listening to the funk styling’s of Earth, Wind & Fire along with the braggadocio rhyme patterns of “The Godfather of Rap” Rudy Ray Moore. Before he passed on, while DA ADDIC was still in his teens, his late Uncle Ojay, already a huge fan of rap music, further exposed his nephew to music, helped him deal with family strife and assisted in honing his craft. “I believe in his passing I was blessed with my gift to create music,” states O. It would be another uncle, Dee, that O DA ADDIC grew up with, who’d put him onto hip-hop: “I started off creating song title first, remembering that Heavy D and Salt-n-Pepa both had songs not a bunch of rhymes. I would then create the rhyme to match to title. Some of my early rhymes were about my struggle adapting to being pushed back and forth, home to home to fun adventure rhymes that would let my mind escape.”

O DA ADDIC is addicted to Hip-Hop. Mind you that isn’t some preconceived notion or something he just says randomly to get you to stop and listen to his raps. It’s real talk proven by his longtime love affair with the game. Not today’s brand of copycat artists and ringtone rappers, but real emcees you might’ve heard of like Rakim, KRS, Ice Cube, Nas, Biggie, Redman…you know the rest. With a versatile flow developed via years of practicing on his own as well as writing his own lyrics and to fit various song titles, there’s no room for gimmicks here as O DA ADDIC has created a style that’s both engaging and uncompromising. Indeed, as he’s evolved from Osha T to Sha’kil to O DA ADDIC, through his penchant for raw lyricism, he’s been able to garner respect from his peers and progress his music as well as his brand. 

O DA ADDIC can teach you a thing or two about perseverance. Long considered to be one of the most promising emcees to come out of New Jersey, he’s seen his share of struggle and broken promises. From opening shows for everyone from R&B group Total to Kanye West to forming the fledging underground group Smoove Brothas, his talent undaunting work ethic has come to define him as well as opening the doors to new opportunities. Most recently, a chance meeting at a show last year that led to O DA ADDIC meeting longtime hip-hop talent scout Pete Smalls--the two immediately bonded and now Smalls is lending a hand as O DA ADDIC’s manager. Fans will soon be able to further venture into O DA ADDIC’s world via his website at http://www.odaaddic.com/.

O DA ADDIC is here to stay. Having recorded a truckload songs to date, his intentions are for longevity as he focuses on building his movement into a brand that stands out in today’s music scene. First there’s a teaser album coming out February 2010, Sex Sells, 17 tracks of raunchy sexcapades (backed by the fledging THEHOOKMASTERS production team) that will literally make your bedsheets moist. Determined on positioning himself as a mainstay in hip-hop culture, O DA ADDIC will be dropping a video for “New New Yorker” (the lead single for his official debut album Can’t Beatem Joinem) soon as well. “I want listeners to feel my every word as if it were their own,” says O DA ADDIC. “I'm not only addicted to hip hop, I'm addicted to life in this crazy world. You can be addicted to drugs, money, love, sex or even the struggle and I’ll have a song to ease your craving, but like every addiction in the world you’ll be feening for more.”
Currently to date O DA ADDIC has been working hard in the studio focusing on his craft to maintain the essence of true hiphop.